Hospital Sant Joan de Déu Barcelona is a teaching hospital specializing in the fields of pediatrics, gynecology and obstetrics. It is located on Passeig Sant Joan de Déu in Esplugues de Llobregat, a municipality bordering Barcelona, Catalonia. It is a privately owned center concerted by the Catalan Health Service which belongs to the Hospitaller Order of St. John of God, a religious organization that manages nearly 300 health centers over the world...

Hospital Sant Joan de Déu Barcelona is a teaching hospital specializing in the fields of pediatrics, gynecology and obstetrics. It is located on Passeig Sant Joan de Déu in Esplugues de Llobregat, a municipality bordering Barcelona, Catalonia. It is a privately owned center concerted by the Catalan Health Service which belongs to the Hospitaller Order of St. John of God, a religious organization that manages nearly 300 health centers over the world. The center has 362 beds and 12 operating rooms. It employs more than 1,200 professionals and attends every year more than 4,000 births, 130,000 emergencies, records 26,000 admissions and 13,000 surgeries performed. 

 

 

The branding and signage redesign project was created by Arauna Studio, Ray Botey and Rai Pinto Studio between 2015 and 2017. Ciutadella font family is the main typeface used for all the design applications in this project.

 

 

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It is always better to try before you buy, and we understand that live testers of foundries websites are not always enough. This is why we are offering free trial fonts of our entire library for you to download, now you can test hundreds of typefaces from more than 20 font families. Despite having a limited character set, you can see how they perform before licensing the full versions... 

 

It is always better to try before you buy, and we understand that live testers of foundries websites are not always enough. This is why we are offering free trial fonts of our entire library for you to download, now you can test hundreds of typefaces from more than 20 font families. Despite having a limited character set, you can see how they perform before licensing the full versions. 

 

 

Trial Fonts can be used only for testing purposes. For instance, you can use test fonts to mock up your designs for contests or use them in academic projects. See the most common examples of test fonts usage below.

 

Allowed uses of trial fonts

– Testing and evaluation

– Paid and unpaid pitches

– Client presentations

– Comping purposes

– Competitions

– Student projects

 

Do not hesitate and get our full catalogue to try. After submitting the form you will receive an automated reply with a link. Have fun!

 

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Steradian is an exploration of the geometric genre and although it has a geometric base, the widths between letters are not much different across the weights, something common of the style. That is due to the process, in which the proportions of the heavier weights paved the way for the lighter ones. It also has a series of details that make Steradian stand out and gives it a special touch. Some of its main features are the double-story ‘a’, its closed apertures and some of the capitals have a distinct personality (such as the G and Q)...

Steradian is an exploration of the geometric genre and although it has a geometric base, the widths between letters are not much different across the weights, something common of the style. That is due to the process, in which the proportions of the heavier weights paved the way for the lighter ones. It also has a series of details that make Steradian stand out and gives it a special touch. Some of its main features are the double-story ‘a’, its closed apertures and some of the capitals have a distinct personality (such as the G and Q). 

 

 

The family has 16 styles, 8 weights plus matching italics.

 

From a historical point of view, this font owes more to the history of typography than any other font in our catalogue. I wanted to do my own geometric version, but how different it could be? The geometric style is a consolidated style with specific rules and little space for innovation. Sometimes the differences depend on some key characters, the style of the numbers and currency set, or even marginal signs like ‘section’. Steradian is inspired by classic geometric typefaces whilst trying to add a twist to this overcrowded genre. It is a moderate typeface: moderate width proportions, moderate vertical proportions and moderate x height too.  

 

 

Steradian basic character set.

 

All of the round letters are derived directly from the circle, but the shapes are not slave to pure geometry. There are many different shades and variations across the family, adapting the original geometric form to multiple widths and weights. As with many typefaces of its style, it has a pseudo geometric approach with lots of adjustments that make it look more refined. On the one hand the light weights are based on a perfect geometric circle while the heavy weights are more expanded in order to allocate more weight to the letters. In terms of weight, strict geometry has inescapable limits.  

 

 

Variation on the original circular shape across the family.

 

The proportions were worked out from the heavy weights, and thanks to a ‘flexible geometry’, the light weights did not suffer the extreme change in proportions that is typical of the geometric style. I tried to find a balance between pure geometry and proportions which resulted in a hybrid font. For example the top and bottom curves of the lowercase ‘s’ are a little bit flat in appearance compared with the ‘o’, but this is all part of the charm of the typeface.  

 

Inspired by classic geometric typefaces whilst trying to add a twist to this overcrowded genre.

 

Some of the characters have distinctive features. In capital letters, ‘G’ has a notorious notch on the right bottom, and capital ‘Q’ has a prominent diagonal. Steradian has a double-story ‘a’ and closed apertures, like in ‘c’ or ‘e’. Some characters have diagonals cuts, like the ‘t’ or the Futura style ‘1’. Finally, letters like ‘t’, ‘j’ and ‘f’ have a sharp endings more typical of the English sans style. 

 

 

Detail of some charecteristic features.

 

There is a more traditional ‘G’ and ‘a’ as alternate characters that turns it into a more classic geometric typeface. During the process I normally design a lot of alternatives for many glyphs just to decide which ones work best, or which combination is more original or adequate for a specific purpose. At the end of the process I edit and reduce all of the alternatives to the essential. For example I had several versions of the ‘Q’ but in the final version there is no alternative because this particular letter contributes a peculiar flavor to the family.

 

Alternative characters.

 

Its personality has a clean and modern voice that transmits a contemporary message, ideal for use in editorial and branding. Its close apertures however make it unadvisable for use in smaller sizes but ideal for intermediate and larger scales, where it shows off all of its idiosyncrasies and distinctive text texture. Steradian is a hybrid geometric sans typeface. Most of the letters have a classical architecture but others are unexpected yet matching. It is intended for use in a wide variety of applications and topics where it will add its distinctive touch. 

 

 

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Isotonic started out as a spin-off with the idea of creating a text oriented version of Ciutadella, It has since taken on a life of its own. Building on a foundation that has proven to work very well, we decided to open the counters and increase the x height. Even though it is not strictly a text font, it works surprisingly well in body sizes and screens. The soft corners gives charm, closeness and an appropriate voice for sports, science, tech, economy etc...

Isotonic started out as a spin-off with the idea of creating a text oriented version of Ciutadella, It has since taken on a life of its own. Building on a foundation that has proven to work very well, we decided to open the counters and increase the x height. Even though it is not strictly a text font, it works surprisingly well in body sizes and screens. The soft corners gives charm, closeness and an appropriate voice for sports, science, tech, economy etc.

Word comparisson between the original Ciutadella and the new Isotonic

 

Isotonic is a close relative of Ciutadella, slightly condensed in comparison. It shares the same structure but has some text features that makes the font more legible: open counters in several letters (a, c, e, s, 2, 3, etc), double-story letter ‘a’ , and a higher x-height. There are some more distinguishing details like the squarish i and j dots, the quotation marks or the subtly rounded corners across the family.

Detail comparisson of the soft corners and the x height with Ciutadella

  

Straight terminals are a recurring resource among techno or futuristic fonts and logos. This is not a new idea, we can see early examples of it in the  XX century with typefaces like Gigant (circa 1900), in the work of Adrian Frutiger with his Element Grotesk, Küppersbusch Systeme logo or the Electricity de France typeface and logo. We could also look at the NASA logo from 1975 or the Nissan logo drawn by Matthew Carter in 1983. Nevertheless, Isotonic is not inspired by any specific typeface, the main idea is to apply straight terminals to a fully functional, multipurpose typeface with a wide range of styles and potential uses.

 

 

Several examples of fonts and logos showing similar features across the past century: Küppersbusch Systeme logo (1980) and Electricity de France typeface (1967 - 1968) images are from Osterer, Heidrun, and Philipp Stamm. Adrian Frutiger - Typefaces: the Complete Works. Birkhauser, 2014. NASA logo by Richard Danne, 1974 and Nissan logo by Matthew Carter, 1983. The Gigant font is from Genzsch & Heyse Schriftgiesserei Proben Von Schriften Und Initialen. Hamburg-München: Genzsch & Heyse, 1913. The last example is from the signboard of Chalamanch bookshop in La Pobla de Segur, Catalonia (circa 1980).

 

The collateral effect of the straight counters is that the typeface becomes hard and mechanical in appearance. We counteracted this effect by using soft corners, striking a balance between mechanical and softness thereby giving a friendly touch to the whole system. 

 

Even though it is not strictly a text font, it works surprisingly well in body sizes and screens.

 

This family has a modern, present-day style but maintains a versatility of use. Isotonic has a unusual personality that distinguishes it from others without being completely new, strange or out of place. Some of its shapes are uncommon for a text face but not uncomfortable, in fact, there are dozens of design applications to which Isotonic is well suited like branding, magazines and web.

Selection of characters with open counters

 

It is available in Open Type format and includes Ligatures, Tabular Figures, Fractions, Numerators, Denominators, Superiors and Inferiors. It supports Central and Eastern European languages. The type family consists of 10 styles, 5 weights (Light, Regular, Medium, SemiBold and Bold) plus italics.

 

  

View Isotonic typeface

 

 

Note: All product and company names mentioned in this article are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective holders. Use of them does not imply any affiliation with or endorsement by them. 

Akkordeon is a display font family roughly inspired by grotesques from the XIX and XX centuries. It is not conceived as a family of constant width but has a variable breadth from narrow to expanded, offering a wide gradation of weights. Akkordeon is designed to be used in short texts such as magazine titles, banners, cover books, charts, advertising, branding and any situation where a compact, solid and powerful font is required... 

Akkordeon is a display font family roughly inspired by grotesques from the XIX and XX centuries. It is not conceived as a family of constant width but has a variable breadth from narrow to expanded, offering a wide gradation of weights. Akkordeon is designed to be used in short texts such as magazine titles, banners, cover books, charts, advertising, branding and any situation where a compact, solid and powerful font is required. 

 

 

The increase of width and visual weight in Akkordeon is not linear. The width, shown in blue, it is progressive across the gradient: while the visual weight, shown in red, becomes almost constant in the bolder styles.

 

Akkordeon is not structured as a typical typographic family where weight and width go separately, Akkordeon does not differentiate between one and the other. The name of the family, Akkordeon (accordion in German) tries to reflect that same idea of flexibility. As a result, the names of the styles also escape the standard nomenclature, they are structured in numbers from one to fourteen to show both the change of weight and width. As the letters increase in weight it stops being condensed in order to accommodate the extra weight. Heavy weights contain an unusual amount of black making them the right choice when impact and force is needed. However the lightest and more condensed weights are subtle and elegant.

 

 

A sample of the letters evolution across the weights. From the compressed thin to the expanded bold in fourteen subtle but significant steps. 

 

In the early XX century the idea of type family was more flexible and less defined than now. Nowadays it is a common thing to create a range of weights between light and bold and in some cases width variations from condensed to expanded. In the past, however, the number of styles of a family and their characteristics were defined by changing needs during different years or even decades mixing width and weight freely. 

 

 

Examples of width and weight increase in a series from American Wood Type: 1828-1900: Notes on the Evolution of Decorated and Large Types and Comments on Related Trades of the Period. New York: Da Capo, 1969 by Rob Roy Kelly.

 

It is not conceived as a family of constant width but has a variable breadth from narrow to expanded, offering a wide gradation of weights.

 

According to Rob Roy Kelly, in some traditional wood types, a width increase was usually accompanied by a weight increase. Varying the width of the styles as they gained weight, a great versatility was achieved because this range of styles easily adapted to changing length texts. These expanding type designs were more popular in the United States than in Europe and there are many turn of the century examples of sprawling series much less systematically designed than later families. 

 

 

Several grotesques from the XIX and XX centuries that were a source of inspiration for several details in the letters and numbers shapes. The images are from Rob Roy Kelly’s American Wood Type:1828-1900. New York: Da Capo, 1969. American Type Founders Company Specimen Book and Catalogue 1923. New Jersey: ATF, 1923. Genzsch & Heyse Schriftgiesserei Proben Von Schriften Und Initialen. Hamburg-München: Genzsch & Heyse, 1913. Inland Type Foundry Pony Specimen Book. Sant Louis: Inland, 1907.

 

In Akkordeon, the weight becomes massive in some styles. Although it starts as a very thin and condensed font, there comes a moment that the increment of weight implies expansion. We decided not to be restrained by the original width but to widen the shapes so as to accommodate an extra amount of black. Combined with adaptive flat sides across the weights, this family achieves its heavy weights without losing its identity and without becoming a caricature of itself.

 

Detail of the adaptive flat sides, reducing the segment as the weight increases. We have used a design space including the five masters above in order to have more control of every detail across the whole system.

 

Thanks to a path that is not often explored, and having some characters with an untamed touch, Akkordeon becomes somewhat special. With that particular approach and family structure, a very rich palette was created, the light weights work as real space saving fonts and the bolder ones become strong for headlines. Akkordeon is specially designed for use in combination with text fonts to generate contrast, like similar typefaces were used it in the past for traditional shows, fair and circus posters and more.

 

 

Some characters with turn of the century grotesques influence 

 

The type family consist of 14 weights and it is available for Desktop, Webfont, ePub, App and Server with support for Central and Eastern European languages. Akkordeon is a versatile display font that offers a wide range of weights as well as creative options.

 

 

View Akkordeon  /  View Akkordeon Slab